Tag Archives: Management

You have options – work hard or work smart?

 “Give me a place to stand and a lever long enough, and I can move anything.”  – Greek mathematician Archimedes

That’s working smarter – that’s quality activity!

smart kidLet’s apply this concept to a modern-day project.  Imagine this scenario, you must move a heavy piece of old furniture out of your garage and to the curb.  You have options – work hard or work smart!

One scenario, working hard, would be to solicit a group of friends/family to tackle this project with you.  This would entail having to select and contact multiple people, coordinate a date and time among their varying schedules, and (if you are a good friend) providing some adult beverages afterward for their effort.  This is a perfectly viable option that will provide the desired result, yet it requires a lot of steps.

Another scenario, working smart, call that one friend or family member who owns a dolly and ask to borrow it.  Then you can do the job yourself and save those coveted adult beverages for the remainder of the weekend.  Another option producing the same result but this one demands far less time, energy, and effort – and keeps the fridge well stocked for the weekend.

Admittedly parts of every job will have tasks we can’t just eliminate.  Still, most jobs do have parts we can combine, delegate, or remove.  Ask yourself, “What existing activities of little value should we eliminate?  What existing activities of high value should we increase? What new activities of high value should we create?” 

Reflect on the questions posed above then take action!

Please share your thoughts in the comments section below as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

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Quitting is not a good choice; except when it is your best choice

“Pain is temporary but quitting lasts forever.”  Sound advice, right?  Maybe or maybe not.

That was a quote from Lance Armstrong and his belief, do not quit at all costs, ended up costing him everything.

quittingSince childhood, we’ve been taught that quitting isn’t an option; that “winners never quit and quitters never win”.  Sounds great on the surface, but let’s be real – quitting is sometimes the best option.  In fact, I would argue that success demands we be perpetually course-correcting, a.k.a. quitting.

Back to Lance Armstrong.  What if he had quit doing the wrong things so that he could do more of the right things? If only he stopped taking those performance enhancing drugs he would likely have some “legitimate” tour de France records.  But he didn’t quit and those seven consecutive records have since been erased from the books.

Herein lies my point, there are times when quitting is the right decision.  Quitting can be a positive process of choosing the path that more fully serves you personally and professionally.  Quitting can be simple tweaking and refocusing in/on a more positive direction.  Quitting can be learning to be more productive, efficient and effective.  It all depends on what you are giving up and why.

Reflect on and identify any areas where your intentions don’t match your actions; where your actions do not match your desired outcomes.  “Quit” those activities/habits which no longer bring you closer to achieving those dreams and goals.  You owe it to yourself!

And while your parents were right that completing what you start is an excellent rule of thumb, it’s not always the best option.  After all, if Lance Armstrong had quit “winning at all costs,” his legacy would be far different than what it is today.

Please share your thoughts in the comments section below as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

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