Sitting on the sideline of life: Why?

A funeral and a wedding anniversary…sideline

Two very different events – but both led me to the same thought – how much time am I spending planning for the future versus living in the present?   Has my life been consumed with looking into a proverbial crystal ball at the expense of enjoying the moment I’m in?

Recently I attended a funeral, more commonly referred to these days as a life celebration.  There I was looking up from a crowd seeing my friend giving a eulogy for his father.  It was a surreal experience and an epiphany for me.  I have been operating on autopilot, preoccupied about the future, and blind to the present.

What potential memories had I sacrificed over the past few months?  Why were my thoughts always out ahead of me?  What had I overlooked?  Who had I overlooked?  These questions and many more were racing through my head.  It wasn’t until the end of the service, as I hugged my buddy’s weeping mother, did I truly become present.  I was one hundred percent in the moment.

Two days later I was heading out for another life celebration, although an entirely different type.  My better half and I were off to the Caribbean.  We were celebrating our ten-year wedding anniversary.  And you know what?  We spent the entire week living in the moment, relishing in the present, and creating lasting memories.  I even turned off my phone, albeit not for an entire day – I’m still working on that.

Today I still allocate time for looking outward, envisioning future aspirations and goals to be met; but I no longer allow myself to be consumed always considering the future.  In the end, all we have is the present.  The past is history, the future always a mystery, but the present moment is our time to shine.

My hope is that you are living in the present, working to positively influence your future.

Please share your thoughts in the comments section below as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

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New Job Jitters: Failure was never an option

Written by Olivia Russell, Recruiter, JFC Workforce

New JobBy nature, I am a methodical person- I like to know the reasons why something is the way it is, how to tackle tasks in a very clear and practical way, any potential roadblocks (and what the response to those would be), and what the end goal is. During my first year here, I can confidently say those things were a huge deterrent to my success. I wouldn’t take action until I was 100% confident in what I was doing and I didn’t know how to ask the right questions in order to understand the “whys”, “hows”, and “whats”.  The conversations I was having with both clients and candidates were lacking clarity, depth, and understanding, which lead to continual frustrations and failures. I wanted so badly to be successful and to represent JFC well and I felt that I was continually coming up short.

For me, failing was not an option; I wanted to make a name for myself while continuing to establish JFC as a competitor in this industry. Thankfully, I work with an incredibly supportive team so I was able to access countless trainings, have one-on-one conversations with my mentor, and spend a lot of time with my branch manager and select senior management. Having that access made all the difference- it allowed me to think about things differently and to take a new approach to my conversations, with that came a new approach to asking the right questions. This is an ever-developing skill but I think it’s safe to say there is a direct correlation between asking the right questions and having a higher placement retention. I was able to see a clear shift between simply staffing each position and recruiting/screening the right candidate(s) for each position. I ask better questions during the interview and really try to hear what the candidate is looking for; much the same, I ask more probing questions with clients in order to hear what really matters to them in the candidate(s) they choose.

In my experience, the key to success is to go after each learning experience, whether that’s a training you’ve already sat in on, to ask a senior manager if you can bend their ear over lunch, to have a conversation that intimidates you, to ask the same question a fourth time. Whenever you think you have it all figured out, I promise, you don’t. If you can allow yourself to learn from your failures and disappointments, you will be better for it.

Please share your thoughts in the comments section below as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

The greatest compliment I can receive is a referral from readers.  Please SHARE my blog with your network.  Thanks for not keeping us a secret!