Do you daydream at work? I do!

Daydreaming may not be as mindless as we think.

As children, we would let our imaginations run wild.  One day we would be firefighters, the next doctors; and by the end of the week full blown superheroes.  Nothing was too big for us to dream up and imagine.

daydreamThen somewhere between adolescence and adulthood this activity got a bad rap.  Time spent with our head in the clouds was now foolish – and that mindset may be hurting us more than it’s helping.  Here’s why…

When we no longer allow our minds to wonder we limit ourselves to only the possibilities that are within reach.    We lose our sense of wonder and curiosity.  And when this occurs, we face a formidable nemesis – a closed mind.

Daydreaming can help the seed of an innovative idea blossom into a tangible plan.  After all, imagination, at its core, starts with an idea and the direction that idea takes has the potential to open a world of opportunities.  Psychologists even propose that those who have realized their full potential and purpose do so through their ability to imagine those possibilities first.

Despite daydreaming’s bad reputation, you should not deny that there are real benefits to getting lost in the corners of your mind.  When harnessed correctly, moments in a free state of mind, allow for true exploration of ideas.  And those very same ideas often lead to great accomplishments.

Embrace the power of daydreaming!

Please share your thoughts in the comments section below as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

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Quitting is not a good choice; except when it is your best choice

“Pain is temporary but quitting lasts forever.”  Sound advice, right?  Maybe or maybe not.

That was a quote from Lance Armstrong and his belief, do not quit at all costs, ended up costing him everything.

quittingSince childhood, we’ve been taught that quitting isn’t an option; that “winners never quit and quitters never win”.  Sounds great on the surface, but let’s be real – quitting is sometimes the best option.  In fact, I would argue that success demands we be perpetually course-correcting, a.k.a. quitting.

Back to Lance Armstrong.  What if he had quit doing the wrong things so that he could do more of the right things? If only he stopped taking those performance enhancing drugs he would likely have some “legitimate” tour de France records.  But he didn’t quit and those seven consecutive records have since been erased from the books.

Herein lies my point, there are times when quitting is the right decision.  Quitting can be a positive process of choosing the path that more fully serves you personally and professionally.  Quitting can be simple tweaking and refocusing in/on a more positive direction.  Quitting can be learning to be more productive, efficient and effective.  It all depends on what you are giving up and why.

Reflect on and identify any areas where your intentions don’t match your actions; where your actions do not match your desired outcomes.  “Quit” those activities/habits which no longer bring you closer to achieving those dreams and goals.  You owe it to yourself!

And while your parents were right that completing what you start is an excellent rule of thumb, it’s not always the best option.  After all, if Lance Armstrong had quit “winning at all costs,” his legacy would be far different than what it is today.

Please share your thoughts in the comments section below as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

The greatest compliment I can receive is a referral from readers.  Please SHARE my blog with your network.  Thanks for not keeping us a secret!  

Follow me on Twitter @JimCarchidi